T Pyx


catalogues and names T Pyx

data from Combined General Catalogue of Variable Stars (Vol. I-III) (Kholopov+ 1998)

position:

position (J1950) RA: 9h 2min 37sec DEC: -32 10' 48'' 1 sec / 0.1 arcmin

variability informations:

variability type NR cataclysmic (explosive and novalike) variables
magnitute at max. brightness 7
magnitute at min. brightness 15,77
photometric system
epoch for maximum light [JD] 2439501
10. January 1967, 12:00:00 UT
year of outburst for nova 1967
mean cycle time [d] 7000

spectral information

spectral class pec(NOVA)

references

to a study the main characteristics of the star was determined by the authors themselves
to a chart/photograph Vol. I GCVS (see Kholopov et al. 1985-1988)

miscanellous

ID in the GCVS catalogue 69/3
constellation Pyxis
notes on existence The star is equivalent to '0690004 U'.
There are notes in published catalog.

variability type description

variability type description
NR Novae. Close binary systems with orbital periods from 0.05 to 230 days. One of the components of these systems is a hot dwarf star that suddenly, during a time interval from one to several dozen or several hundred days, increases its brightness by 7-19 mag in V, then returns gradually to its former brightness over several months, years, or decades. Small changes at minimum light may be
present. Cool components may be giants, subgiants, or dwarfs of K-M type. The spectra of novae near maximum light resemble A-F absorption spectra of luminous stars at first. Then broad emission lines (bands) of hydrogen, helium, and other elements with absorption components indicating the presence of a rapidly expanding envelope appear in the spectrum. As the light decreases, the composite spectrum begins to show forbidden lines characteristic of the spectra of gas nebulae excited by hot stars. At minimum light, the spectra of novae are generally continuous or resemble the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars. Only spectra of the most massive systems show traces of cool components.

Some novae reveal pulsations of hot components with periods of approximately 100 s and amplitudes of about 0.05 mag in V after an outburst. Some novae eventually turn out to be eclipsing systems. According to the features of their light variations,novae are subdivided into fast (NA), slow (NB), very slow (NC),and recurrent (NR) categories.

NA
Fast novae displaying rapid light increases and then, having achieved maximum light, fading by 3 mag in 100 or fewer days (GK Per);

NB
Slow novae that fade after maximum light by 3 mag in >= 150 days (RR Pic). Here the presence of the well-known "dip" in the light curves of novae similar to T Aur and DQ Her is not taken into account: The rate of fading is estimated on the basis of a smooth curve, its parts before and after the "dip" being a direct continuation of one another;

NC
Novae with a very slow development and remaining at maximum light for more than a decade, then fading very slowly. Before an outburst these objects may show long-period light changes with amplitudes of 1-2 mag in V (RR Tel); cool components of these systems are probably giants or supergiants, sometimes semiregular variables, and even Mira variables. Outburst amplitudes may reach 10 mag.
High excitation emission spectra resemble those of planetary nebulae, Wolf-Rayet stars, and symbiotic variables. The possibility that these objects are planetary nebulae in the process of formation is not excluded;

NL
Novalike variables, which are insufficiently studied objects resembling novae by the characteristics of their light changes or by spectral features. This type includes, in addition to variables showing novalike outbursts, objects with no bursts ever observed; the spectra of novalike variables resemble those of old novae, and small light changes resemble those typical for old
novae at minimum light. However, quite often a detailed investigation makes it possible to reclassify some representatives of this highly inhomogeneous group of objects into other types;

NR
Recurrent novae, which differ from typical novae by the fact that two or more outbursts (instead of a single one) separated by 10-80 years have been observed (T CrB).